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The Antikythera Mechanism, the oldest known scientific computer December 13, 2010

Posted by jcconwell in Art, Astronomy.
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Rebuilt with LEGOS! Used to predict lunar and solar eclipses by the ancient Greeks!

Andrew Carol, software engineers at Apple has created fully functional replica of the Antikythera mechanism out of Lego. It’s made from the 1,500 Lego Technic parts and works with 110 gears. The two wings of Carol’s Antikythera consists four gearboxes that calculate as the original mechanism. Each gearbox makes one mathematical calculation. Andrew Carol project was sponsored by Digital Science and took 30 days to compile it. Click the video below for more details.

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Time Lapse Astro Art November 2, 2010

Posted by jcconwell in Art, Astronomy.
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A little artistic moment to begin the week. I’m borrowing these from some sister blogs, “Bad Astronomy” and “Universe Today” . Time-lapse  photography has been around for a while. Couple this old technique with the new technology of high  quantum efficiency cameras, add a flair for editing and music, and you get a nice couple work of arts to start the week. Click on the picture to play the first one “Rapture” by Tom Lowe for more information go to “Bad Astronomy”

 

http://player.vimeo.com/video/16369165

The next one is from our friends at “Universe Today” just click on the picture to start the video “Landscapes Vol.1 ” by Dustin Farrell

http://player.vimeo.com/video/16198274

Astronomy Club Tonight: Carving Pumpkins October 28, 2010

Posted by jcconwell in Art, Observatory.
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Special time 7:00 PM in room 2409, Physical science building. We are carving pumpkins for tomorrow’s observatory open house.

Music on a Planetary Scale: A New Podcast August 20, 2010

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Music on a Planetary Scale

http://365daysofastronomy.org/2010/08/20/august-20th-music-on-a-planetary-scale/

Description: Listen to Mars, now listen to me, now listen to Mars. This is what Mars could sound like, if it sounded like me. Today, we listen to sonification of data, artistic interpretation, and discuss which is ‘better’ and which is ‘more real’.

Bio: Sandy looks at the science and the people in today’s 9-5 pro astronomy world. Born in the heart of a dying star (as we were all), Alex draws from his research, writing, and game design work to bring you the joy of science twice a week at ScientificBlogging.com/skyday– and to launch the first personal science/music satellite via http://ProjectCalliope.com.

At the Tarbel Art Center: Art and Archeoastronomy ! September 7, 2009

Posted by jcconwell in Art, Astronomy, IYA 2009.
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M33 Summer Solstice

Summer solstice setting at an Anasazi Ruin (Credit: J Krebhiel)

 

 

We are lucky to be having a return visit from one of our IYA speakers from the spring. Professor Jim Krehbiel, chair of the Department of Fine Arts at Ohio Wesleyan University. This month EIU’s Tarbel Art Center will be showing an exhibit of Jim’s work. The digital art prints by Jim Krehbiel are based on his exploration and photography of the architecture, art and astronomy of the ancestral Pueblo peoples; presented in conjunction with the International Year of Astronomy; funded in part by the College of Arts & Humanities Excellence in Fine Arts Visiting Artist Fund. The opening artist lecture will be Tuesday, September 8th, at 7:00PM, in the Tarbel Atrium with refreshments.

Chocolate and Raspberries go with Astronomy May 4, 2009

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Well I ran across an article last week at universe today on chocolate,  this combined with a article sent to me about raspberries and astronomy by my friend BA was too good not to put in the blog.

Ethyl formate, which gives raspberries their flavour and smells of rum, has now been found in deep space. Photograph: Tim Graham/Getty

Ethyl formate, which gives raspberries their flavour and smells of rum, has now been found in deep space. Photograph: Tim Graham/Getty

So savor them in any order you choose! Either CHOCOLATE or RASPBERRY !

Chocolate astronomy sculpture. Credit: Museo de Chocolate. | Universe Today      * Subscribe     * Podcast      * Home     * Additional Resources     * Advertise     * Carnival of Space     * Contact Us     * Guide to Space     * Privacy Policy     * Forum  April 29th, 2009 Chocolate astronomy sculpture. Credit: Museo de Chocolate.

Chocolate astronomy sculpture. Credit: Museo de Chocolate.

Tonight: International Year of Astronomy 2009 Art & Archeoastronomy March 9, 2009

Posted by jcconwell in Art, Astronomy, IYA 2009.
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Come join us at 7:00pm tonight. Learn about the recently discovered Anasazi astronomical shrine sites, with Professor Jim Krehbiel, chair of  Fine Arts at Ohio Wesleyan University. The talk is in the new Doudna fine arts center Lecture hall, room 1210.

Professor James Krehbiel